First Time Camping?

Camping can be one of the most enjoyable activities that we humans can indulge in. There’s nothing quite like surrounding yourself with nature and disconnecting from the networked world that we live in. It’s a fantastic opportunity to relax in a peaceful and tranquil environment, and it’s an experience that you can share with any number of people.

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However, it’s also something that will require a bit of experience and knowledge. Trying to camp on your own the first time will usually always lead to mistakes. That’s why it’s vital that you get a bit of experience, read up on some tips and also speak to more experienced campers for help. To make things easier for you, we’ve gathered a couple of professional tips that will help you settle into your first time camping.

camping
Source: https://unsplash.com/photos/fDostElVhN8 (CC0)

“Never ever put your tent under a tree”

Putting your tent under a tree is a one-way ticket to disaster. Not only do you risk random branches and animals falling on your tent, but it can also lead to sticky droplets of sap clinging to your tent. This makes it infuriating to pack away and clean up everything. Always try to put your tent out in an open area!

“If you’re camping for the first time, try to bring a friend or two.”

Camping is a learning experience, but it’s a lot easier if you bring a friend or two along for the ride. It’s even better if you can bring someone with a lot more experience than you!

“Make a list of all the things you need before you go so you don’t forget anything.”

Put together a list of things that you should be taking on your camping trip. Here is a comprehensive camping checklist that you should be following as a rough guideline. If you forget something crucial then it could ruin your entire trip, so put together this list a week or two before you go and constantly change it depending on your needs.

“If you can carry it, always bring some spares.”

Spare socks, clothing, tools and even sheets are always a good idea if it’s your first time camping. We’re going to assume that you’re driving to the campsite, so you can always leave this stuff in the car instead of lugging it around in your pack. However, if you aren’t bringing a car, then only bring a few spares for essentials.

“Always use proper camping grounds before venturing out into the wild.”

Look around your local area for camping grounds and visit them a couple of times before you go out into the wild. These will provide a bit of extra safety and some useful amenities such as flushing toilets, showers and perhaps even a café for food.

“Forget about fully disconnecting; bring some tech stuff to make things easier.”

We know that camping is a great way to disconnect, but it’s foolish not to bring something like a phone and a spare battery for it. It’s an essential tool to help you stay connected with the rest of the world should you end up in an accident, and it also provides a bit of entertainment if you’re worried that you or your group members will be bored.

“Camping food isn’t so bad but you don’t always have to eat out of a tin or packet.”

People get used to camping food eventually but they typically only bring tins and packets if they don’t have much space. If you do have space, feel free to bring proper ingredients and cooking utensils. It helps if you can cook your meals in a single pot since you can throw everything in and wait for it to simmer.

“It helps if you plan your meals in advance.”

If you are short on space but want to cook properly, then try and plan your meals in advance so that you don’t waste any space.

“Practice setting up your tent if you have space in your garden or home.”

Setting up a tent for the first time at the campground can be a nightmare. Practice at home in your garden or even living room if possible. Make sure you have a general idea of what to do and bring any spare tools that you think you might need.

“Get a bigger tent than you think you need.”

When in doubt, always go for the larger tent–you’ll thank yourself later for having more space to move around in.

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